Sleeping

Sleep is vital to nearly every creature’s survival. Every type of creature must sleep, even awakened or otherwise intelligent undead, oozes, constructs, and plants must sleep. Creatures of particularly massive size or of great age often find themselves needing to sleep more and more as time goes on, napping away years and sleeping through centuries. Ancient dragons, creatures of titanic size and with seemingly endless natural lifespans, need more sleep than perhaps any other known creature.

Sleeping is unfortunately not always safe, but ignoring your need for sleep is often far more trouble than it’s worth.

Sleeping Basics

A character must sleep for 8 hours per day. A character may choose to sleep for just 6 hours per day for a number of days equal to their Constitution modifier without risking penalties or a wasted night’s sleep. After a particularly strenuous day (such as nearly exhausting your mana supplies, being rendered unconscious in combat, fighting through an area of constant conflict, etc) or while recovering from serious injuries, a character will often need a number of extra hours of sleep or risk penalties and a wasted night’s sleep (Usually 1d4 extra hours, exceptional circumstances may extend this, GM discretion).

Some creatures rest for different periods of time than those listed above, though the above rules applies to all major races on Creed and most other species. If a creature needs to sleep longer than the time listed above, they are usually awake for somewhat-correspondingly longer periods as well (GM discretion).

If rest is interrupted, each interruption adds additional time to the total amount of time the character has to rest. This additional time is equal to double the duration of the interruption, to a minimum of 1 hour and a maximum of 8 hours (effectively forcing a character to being their rest all over again). A character must have at least 1 hour of uninterrupted rest immediately prior to waking for the night’s sleep to count as restful sleep.

A character may only benefit from rest once within a 24 hour period (meaning 24 hours must pass after resting to heal and regenerate mana before a character can gain such benefits from resting again).

Penalties while Sleeping

A creature that is sleeping takes a -10 penalty on all Perception checks and is considered helpless:

A helpless character takes a –4 penalty to AC against melee attacks. In addition, a helpless character is treated as having a Dexterity of 0, giving him a –5 penalty to AC against both melee and ranged attacks (for a total of –9 against melee and –5 against ranged). A helpless character is also flat-footed.

An unconscious character is considered a willing target and thus accepts any spell or effect with the Harmless descriptor without a saving throw. An unconscious character takes saving throws against all other spells and effects as-normal, though as they are flat-footed they cannot use any reactionary spells, effects, or abilities, and as their Dexterity is 0 the Dexterity modifier for their Reflex saves is reduced to -5.

Poor Sleeping Conditions

A creature that rests or sleeps in medium or heavier armor, or sleeps in an uncomfortable location (such as on sharp rocks), they are automatically fatigued when they awaken and do not gain restful sleep unless they possess either the Endurance feat or some other class or race ability which allows them to sleep in such uncomfortable conditions.

Healing while Sleeping

Rest provides numerous healing effects. One hour spent in complete rest reduces the exhausted condition to the fatigued condition. Eight hours of complete rest eliminates the fatigued condition. Characters additionally heal depending on the time they sleep.

  • One night of rest: The character recovers 1 hp per character level and restores 1 point to each ability score that has been damaged.
  • Twenty-four (24) hours of complete rest: The character recovers 2 hp per character level and restores 2 points to each ability score that has been damaged.
Regaining Mana

For characters that use mana, rest is extremely important. A character must get a full and restful night’s rest to regain their mana.

Losing Sleep

Characters who do not get a full night’s sleep may suffer the effects of sleep deprivation. If a character does not get as much sleep as they need, or their sleep is poor for whatever reason (see above), they must make a DC 10 Constitution check every hour the next day or suffer sleep deprivation. A second night without sleep increases the check to a DC 15 Constitution check, a third night without sleep increases the check to a DC 20 Constitution check, on so on. Once a character has failed a check, they do not need to check again for the rest of the day, unless the fatigue or exhaustions is removed (see below).

  • First failed check: Character becomes fatigued and take a -1 penalty on all attack rolls, damage rolls, saving throws, caster level checks, skill checks and ability checks until they get a restful night’s sleep.
  • Second failed check: Character becomes exhausted and take a -3 penalty on all attack rolls, damage rolls, saving throws, caster level checks, skill checks and ability checks for the remainder of the day. Must make a Will save or attempt to rest whenever presented with the opportunity (DC equals current Constitution check).
  • Third failed check: Character remains exhausted and take a -6 penalty on all attack rolls, damage rolls, saving throws, caster level checks, skill checks and ability checks for the remainder of the day. Hallucinations become a very real threat at this point, usually affecting the character every 1d4 hours (functionally akin to an illusion, Will save DC equals current Constitution check if interacted with). Must make a Will save or attempt to rest whenever presented with the opportunity (DC equals current Constitution check).
  • Fourth failed check: Character passes out and sleeps for 8 hours plus 4 hours per day they’ve remained awake.

The penalties incurred from sleep deprivation are doubled against sleep effects. Fatigue and exhaustion created by sleep deprivation cannot be prevented by an immunity or fortification to such conditions. Effects that remove fatigue or exhaustion can temporarily alleviate the fatigue or exhaustion brought on by sleep deprivation. Once their fatigue or exhaustion is removed, a character suffering from sleep deprivation resumes making their current day’s Constitution checks against sleep deprivation every hour. A character that fails this check regains the fatigued condition (with a second failed check regaining the exhausted condition, if their current stage of sleep deprivation makes them exhausted) but does not progress their sleep deprivation condition.

Special: Endurance gives a +4 bonus on Constitution checks to resist sleep deprivation

Sleeping

Skies of Glass Planeswalker